Foray to Fleet Street

Dismal January is the perfect time to plan a vacation, and my friend and I are currently planning a springtime trip to London! It will be her first time in the UK and my tenth if I remember correctly; so it’s going to be a fantastic eye-opener for her and an interesting time for me, as I will be our travel guide! I’m extremely excited but also a bit nervous– I hope I don’t get us lost or anything. But miscalculations happen to the best of us– my London-born dad once got us on a Tube from Clapham heading south to Morden when we were trying to get back to central London– and I’m really looking forward to the adventure.

Planning this next trip has, however, shocked me into the realization that I still haven’t posted about even half of my last trip in 2015!! This won’t do, so for this post I will take you along on a walk/bus ride I took from south of the Thames, along Fleet Street, and to the Strand. I hope you enjoy it.

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We began with a nosh-up at The George in Southwark, where they serve excellent fish & chips and a nice selection of beer. This galleried coaching inn lays claim to being the oldest pub in London

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Southwark Cathedral stands next to the Thames and overlooks the bustle of Borough Market

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We didn’t go into Southwark Cathedral, but the exterior is beautiful and unusual; with small stones filling in the gaps between the large hewn cornerstones

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The Golden Hind was surrounded by swarms of tourists. This example is the only seagoing replica of the original 16th century galleon, which was captained by Sir Francis Drake

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A nice macabre reminder of the Clink, which was notorious for its poor treatment of prisoners and its opportunistic jailers

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The remains of Winchester Palace, which was the house of the Bishop of Winchester

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The famous Globe Theatre, on the south bank of the Thames

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Shakespeare’s original theatre is gone, but today’s Globe continues to show productions of his work in a very authentic setting

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The Millennium footbridge is a fixture of modern London, and I crossed it for the first time in April

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A view from the footbridge of some of London’s new buildings– it’s always changing

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Tower Bridge can be seen in the distance

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The glorious facade of St. Paul’s greeted us as we came across the bridge

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From St. Paul’s, we took a bus towards Westminster; a double-decker bus, of course. This plaque on Fleet Street caught my eye– it commemorates a T.P. O’Connor, journalist and Parliamentarian, whose pen could “lay bare the bones of a book or the soul of a statesman in a few vivid lines”. I liked that memorial.

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Taking a double-decker lets you see things just above street level which you wouldn’t normally notice

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Even London’s lamp posts are works of art!

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Some beautiful carvings of what seem to be heraldic crests

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Charing Cross Station, always busy! The architecture is really quite unique and striking

It will be amazing to be in London again in the spring, and I think posting about my last trip will help me to get all excited and ready for it! London is always memorable, and I feel that this next trip will be even more special and exciting.

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4 thoughts on “Foray to Fleet Street

  1. If you go back to the George Inn, have them show you Charles Dickens’s Last Will, framed on the wall–there’s a good story behind it. We’re headed to London in late February–it’ll be brisk, but hoping for sunny days so we can really hoof around the city. Loved the post and the photos!

    • Wonderful, thanks for that tidbit! I had no idea about it when I was there. I hope you have some good weather for your trip, although I’m sure you’ll enjoy it nonetheless! London is such a beautiful place. I’m glad you like the post, and thanks for commenting.

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