Highgate’s Heroes: Pt. 2

In today’s post I am revisiting London’s famous Highgate Cemetery; well-known around the world for its overgrown graves and rather eerie Gothic allure. Less famous, however, are Highgate’s numerous war graves, and it is these graves that I put my attention to. Highgate has a surprising 316 graves registered by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Although I tried, I was certainly unable to locate them all; so until I can return to Highgate and continue my photographic quest, I hope the photos in this post and Pt. 1 are a good start.

London 2015 Adair 599

Lieutenant T.A. Prior of the London Rifle Brigade, died 1921

London 2015 Adair 600

Gunner O. Bowyer of the Royal Field Artillery, died 1918

London 2015 Adair 602

Sergeant C.T.L. Clement of the Royal Air Force, died 1944

London 2015 Adair 604

Private S. Kemp of the Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, died 1918

London 2015 Adair 607

Corporal H.A. Taylor of the Canadian Infantry, died 1919

London 2015 Adair 609

Private P.S. Jackson of King Edward’s Horse, died 1917; and his brother, Ronald Singleton Jackson, died 1918

London 2015 Adair 614

Corporal Walter Percy Scott of the Royal Air Force, died 1920

London 2015 Adair 615

Aircraftman 2nd Class F.E. Sorgatz of the Royal Air Force, died 1944

London 2015 Adair 618

Cadet R.E.D. Bedford of the Officers Training Corps, died 1916

London 2015 Adair 621

Sergeant W.J. Parry of the Machine Gun Corps, died 1919

London 2015 Adair 623

Lance-bombardier R.M. Jones of the Royal Artillery, died 1943

London 2015 Adair 625

Private Manley Frederic Ashwin of the Artist’s Rifles, died 1918

London 2015 Adair 627

Sergeant H.T.A. Walters of the Royal Air Force, died 1943

London 2015 Adair 631

Lieutenant-Colonel C.E. Earle of the Cheshire Regiment, died 1917

London 2015 Adair 633

Lieutenant B. Conan-Davies of the York and Lancaster Regiment, died 1918

Highgate feels like a forgotten place– it’s so quiet and isolated under the leafy boughs and strains of ivy that have taken over the cemetery. But perhaps that silence and isolation symbolises the rest that the soldiers buried here deserve, after their courageous service and the violent, horrific experiences they surely had. And I hope that these posts have helped to ensure that they are remembered.

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